UCLA Headlines September 9, 2013

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IN THE NEWS:
 
Facebook as a Tool for HIV Prevention
Asian News International reported Saturday, and the Huffington Post reported Friday, on a study led by Sean Young, assistant professor of family medicine and director of innovation at the Center for Behavior and Addiction Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, that found that Facebook discussion groups helped men at high risk of HIV infection increase healthy behaviors and get tested for HIV. Young was quoted in the coverage.
 
New Type of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
The Press Trust of India reported Saturday, and RedOrbit reported Friday, that UCLA researchers have discovered a new form of irritable bowel syndrome that occurs after an acute bout of diverticulitis. Dr. Brennan Spiegel, associate professor of digestive diseases and gastroenterology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, was quoted in the coverage.
 
Does Pornography Lead to Sexism?
Science Daily reported Friday on a study by Neil Malamuth, UCLA professor of communication studies and psychology, and colleagues that examined whether and to what extent exposure to pornography alters men's attitudes toward women.
 
The New Teaching Career: Short
Today's Washington Post features a blog column by UCLA professor of education Mike Rose about how the teaching profession is being redefined by "reformers" who don't put much stock in the value of the length of a teacher's experience.
 
How the White House Was Won
Science Blog reports today on "The Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Presidential Election," a new book co-authored by Lynn Vavreck, UCLA associate professor of political science, that argues that the presidential race was influenced more by the economy than any other factor. Vavreck is quoted.
 
Words We Use Reflect Our Shifting Values
Business Insider reported Friday on research by UCLA distinguished professor of psychology Patricia Greenfield that tracked the use of certain words in more than 1.5 million American and British books published between 1800 and 2000 to demonstrate how cultural values have changed over time. Greenfield was quoted.
 
Conspicuous Consumption and Clutter
An column in Virginia's Roanoke Times today about consumer culture and spending on children's birthday gifts cited a study by the UCLA Center on Everyday Lives of Families (CELF) that examined in intimate detail the home lives — and household clutter — of 32 middle-class families with children in Los Angeles.
 
Climate Change Will Make L.A. Hotter
Ecoseed and the Long Beach Press-Telegram reported Friday on research by Alex Hall, associate professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences and director of the Center for Climate Change Solutions at UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, and colleagues predicting that climate change will cause temperatures in the Los Angeles region to rise by an average of 4 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit by the middle of this century. Hall; Cara Horowitz, executive director of the Emmett Center on Climate Change and the Environment at the UCLA School of Law; Glen MacDonald, director of the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and a professor of geography and of ecology and evolutionary biology; and J.R. DeShazo, director of UCLA's Luskin Center for Intervention and Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies and associate professor of public policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, were featured in Ecoseed.
 
Helping LAPD Fight Crime With Math
KPCC-89.3 FM's "Take Two" reported today on the "predictive policing" work of UCLA researchers, who have applied sophisticated mathematics to urban crime patterns to help the Los Angeles Police Department determine which areas are likely to become crime "hotspots" and which of those areas will most likely be affected by intensified police actions.
 
Monitoring Home Health-Care Workers
KPCC-89.3 FM reported today, and California Healthline reported Friday, on a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research that concluded that more regulation is needed to ensure that home health-care workers in California are qualified. Nadereh Pourat, director of research at the center, was interviewed on KPCC and quoted in California Healthline.
 
Preserving the Historic Watts Towers
Live Science reported Friday on the history of the Watts Towers in South Los Angeles and current efforts by UCLA engineers and others to prevent the landmark from deteriorating. Robert Nigbor, a research engineer at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, was quoted.
 
Protecting Brains of Athletes, Soldiers
Vijay Gupta, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, was interviewed Friday on KCRW-89.9 FM's "Which Way, LA?" about his development of a polymer that could diminish the force of helmet-to-helmet contact on a football field or shockwaves from explosive devices on a battlefield.
 
Will Smartphones Boss Us Around?
Gary Small, a professor of psychiatry who holds Parlow–Solomon Chair on Aging and directs the Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, was interviewed Friday on KCRW-89.9 FM's "To the Point" about "predictive technology," in which smartphones and other devices provide users with potentially useful information before they ask for it.
 
Free Event Screens for Autism
Dr. Alice Kuo, associate professor of internal medicine and pediatrics and a member UCLA's Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, was interviewed Saturday on KCBS-Channel 2 about an event hosted by the group Autism Speaks at which low-income families with children were given free access to autism doctors and specialists.
 
Metro Jobs for African American Workers
The Black Worker Center at UCLA's Center for Research on Labor and Education was cited Saturday in a Los Angeles Times article about a rally in Los Angeles Leimert Park neighborhood aimed at securing construction jobs for local residents on a new Metro rail project.
 
Obama's Policy on Syria
On Saturday, the History News Network website featured an op-ed by James Gelvin, UCLA professor of history and author of "The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know," on the aims of the Obama administration in proposing military intervention in Syria.
 
Sexless in Sacramento
The Sacramento Bee reports today on results of the California Health Interview Survey, conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, showing that one in five middle-aged Sacramento adults did not have sex during the previous year.
 
New Strain of Dangerous Virus
Dr. Brad Spellberg, assistant professor of medicine and infectious diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, was interviewed Thursday on CBS's "The Doctors" about the recent spread of a SARS-like virus that can be passed from human to human.
 
Social Security: To Wait or Not to Wait
Suzanne Shu, assistant professor of marketing at UCLA's Anderson School of Management, was interviewed Sunday on American Public Media's "Marketplace" about the factors that determine the age at which people decide to claim their Social Security benefits.
 
Music to His Ears
Sunday’s Los Angeles Times featured a profile of Adam Schoenberg, a lecturer in the UCLA Department of Music. Schoenberg was quoted.
 
Brain Tumor Removed Successfully
Dr. Isaac Yang, assistant professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, was interviewed Saturday on CBS’s “The Doctors” about a patient of his who underwent surgery to remove a brain tumor.
 
One Last Time Around the Moon
David Paige, professor in the UCLA Department of Earth and Space Sciences, was interviewed Friday by KNBC-Channel 4 about the launch of NASA’s last planned lunar orbiter.
 
 
QUOTABLE:
 
Dr. Patricia Ganz
Ganz, director of cancer prevention and control research at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, was quoted Friday in a Reuters article about the quality of life for breast cancer survivors.
 
Gilbert Gee
Gee, a senior research fellow at the UCLA School of Law’s Williams Institute, was quoted Saturday in a Pasadena Star-News article about recent national stories involving racial issues.
 
James Gelvin
Gelvin, UCLA professor of history, was quoted Sunday in a Sacramento Bee op-ed about possible solutions to the problems in Syria.
 
Edward Leamer
Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast and Chauncey J. Medberry Professor of Management at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, was quoted Friday in a San Gabriel Valley Tribune article about the U.S. labor market.
 
Aimee Drolet Rossi
Rossi, professor of marketing at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, was quoted Friday in an Inc.com article about problems facing the yogurt company Chobani.
 
Dr. Gary Small
Small, UCLA's Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging and a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, is quoted Sunday in London Times article about a theory that writer Jack Kerouac died of degenerative brain disease brought on by playing football.  
 
Michael Stoll
Stoll, professor of public policy and urban planning and chair of public policy at UCLA's Luskin School of Public Affairs, was quoted Thursday in a Phoenix Business Journal article about the most transient cities in the United States.
 
Dr. Denise Sur
Sur, chief of staff at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, and vice chair of education for the UCLA Department of Family Medicine, was quoted Friday in a Santa Monica Daily Press article about pediatric vaccinations.
 
Chris Tilly
Tilly, director of the UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment and a professor of urban planning at UCLA's Luskin School of Public Affairs, was quoted Sunday in a Los Angeles Daily News article about the AFL-CIO convention currently underway in Los Angeles.
 
Eugene Volokh
Volokh, the Gary T. Schwartz Professor at the UCLA School of Law, was quoted Sunday in an article in Salt Lake City's Deseret News about the California Legislature debating a bill that would make it a misdemeanor for people to distribute sexually explicit photos or videos they'd shot in order to cause others humiliation or distress.
 
Adam Winkler
Winkler, professor at the UCLA School of Law, was quoted Sunday in a Washington Post about the growing phenomenon of "nullification," in which states enact laws that defy the power of the federal government.
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