UCLA In the News August 14, 2018

UCLA In the News lists selected mentions of UCLA in the world’s news media. See more UCLA In the News.

U.S. News announces 2018-19 best hospitals | U.S. News & World Report

UCLA Health hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica ranked No. 1 in Los Angeles, No. 2 in California and No. 7 nationally in the annual U.S. News & World Report assessment released Monday. It’s the 29th consecutive year that U.S. News has placed UCLA Health on its honor roll, a distinction reserved for only 20 hospitals in the nation that deliver high-quality care across a range of specialties, procedures and conditions. (Also: Sacramento Bee, Patch, California Healthline)

These are the 25 best colleges in the U.S. right now | Money

Nearly seven in 10 freshmen say they worry about how they’ll pay for their college education, according to a national survey conducted each fall by researchers at UCLA. (Also: KPCC–FM, Patch)

Private gifts to higher education: another big win for philosophy | Chronicle of Higher Education

The field of philosophy has attracted its second major gift of the year. In January, the Johns Hopkins University announced a $75-million gift for its philosophy department. Now the University of California at Los Angeles has said that its philosophy department will receive $20 million of a $25-million donation made in honor of two UCLA professors. (Account required)

Many California detainees are Indians crossing through Mexico to seek asylum | Los Angeles Times

Vinay Lal, a history professor at UCLA, said that although he has not seen evidence of Indian refugees coming to the U.S. to escape political persecution, it is possible. He said he views the greater trend of Indian immigrants crossing through Mexico as part of a global “migration crisis” rather than a political one. “I think that the word has gone out that there are various ways that you can try to move,” Lal said, “and coming through the Mexican border remains one of the more accessible ways.”

A transition in transgender care | U.S. News & World Report

“There’s a very real threat that there will be a direct assault on the LGBT community. Rescinding 1557 by the Trump administration would be a disservice to providers who understand their responsibility to implement the law for all communities in effective ways,” says Jocelyn Samuels, executive director of the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law. Samuels served under Obama as director of the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, where she led the development of Section 1557’s discrimination-barring regulations. “We thought (the change) was going to happen in July,” she says.

How artificial intelligence is changing teaching | Chronicle of Higher Education

Technology alters teaching environments in critical ways, yet there is little public scrutiny of those changes, says Elana Zeide, a technology-law expert and fellow at the University of California at Los Angeles’ School of Law. “It’s being adopted without much thoughtfulness or much education of the people using the tools.” (Account required)

More than 50% of California county has burned since 2012 | Los Angeles Times

UCLA climate scientist Daniel Swain said the Mendocino Complex fire — actually two blazes, the Ranch fire and the River fire — became so bad because of explosively flammable vegetation, warm overnight temperatures and the lingering effect of years of drought. The blaze has burned mostly into the Mendocino National Forest. So far, no one has been killed. “It’s sort of this middle elevation, where you’re above the marine layer, but you’re not high enough in the mountains to really cool down either,” he said. 

Interior secretary takes forestry fight to fire-ravaged California | The Hill

Glen MacDonald, a professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles, says that the argued benefits of logging are complicated and don’t always fall along party lines. “This debate does not always come down easily to a simple model of conservation groups and scientists versus logging companies,” MacDonald said. “Some conservation groups, such as the venerable Save the Redwoods League, have launched logging plans for second-growth forest as part of their overall strategy for sustaining healthy redwood forests in the northwestern portions of the state.” He said the debate isn’t likely to be settled anytime soon, and that fires will worsen due to climate change.

College dorms are training grounds in political civility | USA Today

Today, college residence halls are the most diverse places that most of their residents will ever live. On most campuses, that’s true socioeconomically, racially and politically. In the latest national annual survey of incoming four-year college freshmen conducted by UCLA, they self-identified as 31 percent liberal, 20 percent conservative and 42 percent middle of the road.

Not all women eligible for breast cancer gene tests are getting them | Reuters Health

“At the end of the day, this falls back on the doctors,” [UCLA’s Deanna] Attai said. “Unfortunately this is one of many studies showing we’re not doing a great job in identifying the patients who need to be tested. Physicians may not be aware that it’s covered. They may not be aware of the guidelines.” But that’s no excuse, Attai said. “We’ve gotten to the point where we can’t keep all this stuff in our heads and that’s OK,” she added. “It’s fine, when a patient comes in, to pull up the guidelines on your computer and go through a checklist. You could potentially be saving lives.”

Crayfish are leading to more mosquitos in Southern California | KTLA-TV

Researchers at UCLA say the red swamp crayfish is a non-native species here in Southern California but it’s often found in rivers and streams. The crayfish are eating dragonflies, which feed on mosquito larvae. Researchers say the crayfish are driving away the predators that keep the mosquito population in check. That means more mosquitos, which means a greater risk of diseases like Zika, West Nile and possibly even malaria.

How California hopes to halt the revolving door to the ER | CALmatters

Studying super-users is relatively new, and the private sector is also exploring ways to improve their care and cut costs. According to Nadereh Pourat, director of research at UCLA’s Center for Health Policy Research, no other state has this kind of project. But they will, she said, once savings can be realized and documented in California. A single hospital stay can cost $10,000, Pourat said. “If you can avoid one hospital visit a week, you could reduce costs by 2 percent or 3 percent, and that’s significant savings.”

Young adults favor family over friends if forced to choose | HealthDay

“Our study suggests mom still matters,” said senior author Jennifer Silvers, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Parents continue to have an enduring impact on their children as they become adults ­­— and on their decision-making,” she said in a university news release.

Red Sanders’ impact on UCLA football has lasted well past his death | Los Angeles Times

[UCLA’s Red Sanders] guided UCLA to two Rose Bowl appearances and its only national championship, in 1954, while featuring the only team in college football history to lead the nation in both scoring and scoring defense. In nine games that season, the Bruins outscored opponents 367-40. Along the way, Sanders became a bigger deal on campus than John Wooden, the basketball coach who would become a legend.

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