UCLA In the News February 6, 2019

UCLA In the News lists selected mentions of UCLA in the world’s news media. See more UCLA In the News.

The deadliest quake of 2018 was among the fastest ever | New York Times

In the second study, a team led by Han Bao of the University of California, Los Angeles, assembled a second-by-second timeline of the rupture from surface radar imagery and the dense network of seismic stations around the Indian Ocean. This team, too, observed that the rupture outran its S-waves. Much as a motorboat or supersonic jet outruns its wake, the rupture generated an expanding, V-shaped pattern of disruption, known as a Mach cone, behind it.

SpaceX test-fire of Mars spaceship’s flight engine is milestone for its engine development | Los Angeles Times

“It’s a major accomplishment for SpaceX and a major advancement in space engineering,” said Richard Wirz, associate professor in aerospace engineering at UCLA and director of the university’s plasma and space propulsion laboratory. (UCLA’s Ann Karagozian also quoted)

The healthiest Californians are the ones who are healthy together | Zócalo Public Square

In the foreign cultures, “there’s this continuity and connectedness that’s fundamental to your being. You are never alone,” said UCLA medical anthropologist Marjorie Kagawa-Singer. “We’ve lost that here” in the U.S…. “Modern medicine,” Kagawa-Singer said, offers “a very mechanistic view of the body isolated from the spirit, the family, and the community.… And if there’s an immediate infection, biomedicine is great. But if you’re talking about chronic issues and mental illness, you have got to put the whole person back together again.” (UCLA’s Dr. David Hayes-Bautista also quoted)

Elite colleges a better bet for low-income minority students, ranking finds | Education Dive

Last year, Forbes’ Best Value Ranking of colleges, which considers access for low-income students, found some similar results to the charter school’s list. The University of California System campuses in Los Angeles and Berkeley topped the list at No. 1 and No. 2, respectively.

Vermont was ‘the most popular state to move to’ last year, study says. Here’s why | CNBC

“The data aligns with longer-term migration patterns to southern and western states, trends driven by factors like job growth, lower costs of living, state budgetary challenges and more temperate climates,” Michael Stoll, economist and professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, says in the report.

Airport construction threatens unexplored archaeological sites in Peru | Science magazine

Unlike those, Chinchero has remained largely untouched. Its preservation is “phenomenal,” says Stella Nair, an architectural historian at the University of California, Los Angeles, who spent a year in Chinchero measuring and mapping the Incan imperial buildings and landscaping that still dot the town and the farmland around it. “The key for studying the architecture is finding sites that haven’t been altered for tourist consumption. And that is incredibly hard,” she says.

Transgender troops to attend State of the Union as Trump pursues ban | Los Angeles Blade

According to a 2014 study from the Williams Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles, there are more than 15,000 transgender Americans in active duty and 153,000 transgender veterans.

Health care premiums may continue to skyrocket under ACA | Inside Sources

Gerald Kominski, professor of health policy at the University of California Los Angeles and senior fellow at UCLA’s Center for Health Policy Research, told InsideSources that lawmakers assumed the health care industry would stabilize by the time the reimbursement provision phased out, and that insurance companies wouldn’t need reimbursements to keep premium costs down. “Once the market was up and running over the next few years, the original ACA assumed it wouldn’t need this protection,” he said. “I think this report is saying this thinking was wrong.”

For chronic pain sufferers, this treatment provides long-term relief | USA Today

As described by Dr. Joshua Prager, director of the Center for Rehabilitation of Pain Syndromes at UCLA, a typical procedure under his care takes about an hour. Recovery from surgery is under two weeks, but patients have restrictions on movement for several more weeks. Patients should avoid quick twisting or heavy lifting for the period right after implementation but can generally go back to their normal routine fairly quickly.

Electric street scooters are coming to Sacramento. See when and where | Sacramento Bee

UCLA researchers released a study last week of 249 scooter-related injuries — seen at two Los Angeles hospital emergency rooms — and found that 80 percent came from riders falling, 11 percent from hitting an object, and 9 percent from a crash with a car, bicycle or other scooter. Forty percent involved head injuries, and 32 percent involved broken bones.

Trump is expected to call for an end to HIV in the U.S. by 2030. That’s totally realistic | Vox

“We’ve generated phenomenal tools to end AIDS. We have a single pill that can be taken once a day to treat AIDS and a single pill that can be taken once a day to prevent AIDS. The challenge has been how to implement these tools, and the barrier has been a lack of funding,” said UCLA’s Jeffrey Klausner.

Trash and rain | KPCC-FM’s “Take Two”

“Our storm drain system and our sewer system are completely separate. So that means all of the trash on the street and in a lot of the catch basins and in our rivers, like the L.A. River … and so all of that gets flushed out into the ocean after every rain. As a result, our beaches look like landfills after every major rain,” said UCLA’s Mark Gold. (Approx. 9:11 mark)

Big Health launches mobile therapy app aimed at anxiety disorders  | Fierce Biotech

Developed in collaboration with Boston University, the University of California, Los Angeles, the University of Oxford and the University of Texas, Austin, the company’s app — named Daylight — employs cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques to teach users how to respond to stressors.

Sizzling interest in lab-grown meat, but technical hurdles remain | Nature

Other researchers want to apply lessons learned from decades of research in regenerative medicine. Amy Rowat, a biophysicist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who normally studies the biomechanics of cancer cells, is attempting to design scaffolds that can grow combinations of different types of cow cell to promote the marbling of fat in lab-grown steaks.

Finally, some insight on the impact of IPOs on home prices | San Francisco Chronicle

“Our initial guess was that the big effect was going to be at the expiration of lockup,” said Barney Hartman-Glaser, an assistant finance professor at UCLA who co-authored the study. Maybe it didn’t because “the lockup is anticipated. If I’m a seller, and I know that in two months a bunch of people will have a lot more money to spend, why would I accept a lower price two months earlier? I just won’t sell,” he said.

Study claims marijuana smokers have more sperm | Daily Beast

Jesse Mills, director of the Men’s Clinic at the University of California, Los Angeles, also reviewed the study’s findings and echoed Chavarro’s warning that the study has no practical application for men struggling with infertility.  “Maybe one chemical of the dozens studied has a hormonal effect that stimulates the testicle to crank out more sperm, but that’s a stretch without any bench science to support the hypothesis,” he said. “Until there’s a study showing men who actively smoke weed have better sperm counts, I’ll keep my prescription pad in my pocket.”

Backlash after study refutes idea that breakfast is the most important meal of the day |  Vancouver Sun

Despite headlines like, “Skip brekkie, lose 1 lb,” others, too, were unconvinced. “I don’t feel the findings are robust enough to recommend (forgoing breakfast) as a weight-loss strategy for most people,” Dana Hunnes, a senior dietician at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles told Live Science.

Role of environmental factors in Parkinson’s development investigated in review study | Parkinson’s News Today

“The greatest risk factors for [Parkinson’s] are likely environmental and not genetic,” Honglei Chen, MD, PhD, from Michigan State University, and Beate Ritz, MD, PhD, from the University of California Los Angeles, said in a press release. “Yet we know relatively little about environmental causes or triggers. Identifying these and defining ways to reduce their impact will be great research challenges for the coming two decades.”

Time for another go at waferscale computer | Tech Xplore

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of California, Los Angeles, are behind the recent development for a wafer-scale computer that aims to be faster, more energy efficient, than contemporary counterparts.

Transgender basics and beyond | Endocrine News

A June 2016 study from the University of California Los Angeles School of Law’s Williams Institute found that about 0.6% of the U.S. adult population identifies as transgender. “This figure is double the estimate that utilized data from roughly a decade ago and implies that an estimated 1.4 million adults in the U.S. identify as transgender,” the authors (Flores, et al) write.

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