UCLA In the News October 2, 2018

UCLA In the News lists selected mentions of UCLA in the world’s news media. See more UCLA In the News.

UCLA’s Ribas among researchers praising choice of Allison for Nobel Prize in medicine | Washington Post

On Monday, other researchers praised Allison’s selection, saying it was long overdue. “For 100 years, we were trying to turn on the immune system, and it didn’t work for cancer, or just anecdotally,” said Antoni Ribas, an immunologist at the University of California at Los Angeles. “He figured out how to allow our immune system to attack cancer. It opened the door to a new line of therapies.”

Why the divorce rate among millennials may be dropping | KPCC-FM’s “AirTalk”

“I think there are a lot of different things that we could point to and a lot of different issues that demographers are exploring right now. I think the first thing that many of us are looking at is while divorce rates have been declining — and as you pointed out, this is especially true for younger Americans — we’ve also seen a decline in marriage. And I would say it doesn’t take a demographer to know that you actually have to get married first in order to become divorced,” said UCLA’s Megan Sweeney. (Approx. 1:01 mark)

California’s gun laws get even tougher, but Brown also blocks some bills | San Francisco Chronicle

Overall, Brown’s bill signings and vetoes — among the final ones of his last term as governor — were in keeping with his “long history of a nuanced, balanced approach to gun restrictions,” said Adam Winkler, a UCLA law professor who has studied firearms issues.

‘Yo-yo’ cardio readings may signal later health risks | HealthDay

Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, found these findings interesting. “This opens up a new avenue for accounting for variation in risk factors over time in estimating risk for cardiovascular disease,” he said. “Better identification of those at higher and lower risk may translate to better use of prevention strategies and therapies.”

Sex-linked differences in cancer may identify gender-specific genetic drivers and predict responses to treatment | Medical Xpress

“The results from our pan-cancer analysis suggest that there are fundamental underlying differences in the way that male and female tumors initiate and progress,” said [Paul] Boutros, formerly associate professor at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and now director of Cancer Data Sciences at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. “This indicates that researchers need to be cognizant of the incorporation of sex in biomarker discovery pipelines, particularly in the translational research arena.”

Kanye West’s controversial tweets on the 13th Amendment | KTTV-TV

“I was personally opposed to it and understood that he really didn’t know very much about the institution of slavery and how it operated.… What they believe is that the Constitution allows enslavement to continue through our prison system.… It’s a little bit of a stretch in the sense that people still do have certain rights when they are in prison. And, of course, when you were enslaved, you had very few rights, less rights than that,” said UCLA’s Brenda Stevenson. (Approx. 2:00 mark – video download)

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