UCLA In the News September 27, 2018

UCLA In the News lists selected mentions of UCLA in the world’s news media. See more UCLA In the News.

McKinsey advises Puerto Rico on debt. It may profit on the outcome | New York Times

“It’s a conflict of interest,” said Lynn M. LoPucki, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the founder of the school’s Bankruptcy Research Database. “They are making decisions that will determine how much money is given to themselves.”

California’s economic forecast | KNBC-TV

The report from UCLA’s Anderson School of Management says growth will weaken at both the state and national level in 2020. Economists say the trade talks to overhaul NAFTA will have little impact, but the escalating tensions between the U.S. and China threatens to affect supply chains. (Approx :45 mark – video download) (Also:  KPCC-FM)

With or without Rosenstein, Russia probe will survive | Los Angeles Times Opinion

(Commentary written by UCLA’s Harry Litman) Whatever measures a new overlord could take, it’s a good bet that Mueller and his team will be ready to parry them, if not fully then at least sufficiently to complete the basic work of the probe and bring their findings to light. That makes it very unlikely that Trump will find a way to avert Mueller’s eventual harsh judgment, and all that flows from it.

Why a weird frog should care about Kavanaugh appointment | The Atlantic

“There’s no way to predict it. There are many people looking at the past views of the justices and saying they expect it to be a 4–4 split. But there isn’t any way to know that,” says Sean Hecht, a law professor at UCLA who represented E.O. Wilson and other scientists in this case.

Study has identified a biomarker for drowsiness: Can we use it to prevent sleep-deprived driving? | Forbes

Another study conducted by the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center found that just 1 beer can impair someone who slept only 4 hours in the same manner that drinking 6 beers impairs someone who has had a full night’s sleep.

In California, 2 in 3 kids fail to meet exercise standards, according to study | Medical Xpress

California's weather encourages year-round outdoor activity. Yet just 1 in 3 children and only 1 in 5 teens in the state exercise for the one hour per day that's recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

We still haven’t learned from Anita Hill’s testimony | New York Times Opinion

(Commentary written by UCLA’s Kimberlé Crenshaw) Twenty-seven years after Anita Hill testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee that Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her, and as Christine Blasey Ford prepares to testify that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers, we still have not learned our mistakes from that mess in 1991.

Survival after cardiac arrest may depend on which EMS agency shows up | Reuters Health

Cardiac arrest “is the abrupt loss of heart function, and if appropriate steps are not taken immediately it most often is fatal,” explained Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiovascular medicine and science at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and co-director of the UCLA Preventive Cardiology Program. “Each year in the United states more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital setting.”

Immunotherapy offers a promising bet against brain cancer | Nature

“Immunotherapy is probably the only modality that can attack this problem of the tumour outsmarting the treatment,” says Linda Liau, a neurosurgeon at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center. “It’s a treatment that can change with the tumour.”

Why do my eyes water when I yawn? | Self

As you know, when you yawn, your face scrunches up and you usually either close your eyes or squeeze them until they’re practically shut. This puts pressure on the lacrimal glands under your eyebrows, which can cause them to produce more of that watery layer of your tears, Vivian Shibayama, O.D., an optometrist and contact lens specialist with UCLA Health, tells Self. Bam — now your eyes runneth over.

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