This story originally appeared in UCLA Today, a discontinued publication.

New logo to strengthen UCLA's visual identity

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the mark of excellence

Courtesy of UCLA Trademark & Licensing
A rendering of a future UCLA store to open in China shows how the new logo could be used.

As part of its broader identity program, UCLA has introduced a new logo that is appearing around campus on signs, Web sites and in publications (including this newspaper).

The new logo is a key element in a UCLA graphic identity system that is the culmination of a yearlong effort by University Communications, a campus team that includes Administrative Vice Chancellor Peter Blackman, UCLA Healthcare, UCLA Extension and the award-winning graphic design firm of Keith Bright Strategic Design.

UCLA’s visual identity has been fragmented by a glut of inconsistent logo designs, typefaces, symbols and colors, administrators said. The goal of the project is to bring order out of this chaos in a way that will, in Chancellor Albert Carnesale’s words, “enhance the association of UCLA with world-class quality through visual representation, and thus help to demonstrate the quality and breadth of the academic enterprise.”

Logo marks are essential to an institution’s visual identity, said Assistant Vice Chancellor for University Communications Lawrence Lokman, who is overseeing the project. “A visual image has the power to evoke a complex set of associations, almost an emotional response, from people. But with scores of different logos in use, the university has been diluting that identity.”

Said Vice Chancellor for External Affairs Michael Eicher: “UCLA is one of the most recognized and respected names in higher education. A graphic identity that supports and enhances our reputation for excellence by projecting a consistent, high-quality and instantly recognizable visual image is vital.”

Many campus units already have adopted the new identity system. They include UCLA Extension, the UCLA Library, the International Institute and the Center for Community Partnerships, to name a few. There is one exception to the rule: the UCLA script logo for athletic and spirit-related uses will remain unchanged. While the script is too sporty to serve as an institutional logo, it is recognized as part of UCLA tradition and appropriate for athletics, Lokman said.

The $90,000 price tag for the project —which includes the new logo, graphic identity system, standards manual and identity Web site — “is not too much to pay for a system that will increase the quality, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the university’s far-reaching communications efforts,” Lokman said. “Now we have a system that provides UCLA and all its units with a cohesive visual presence, a powerful new tool for leveraging and building on UCLA’s reputation for excellence.”

For more information on and guidelines for the new UCLA logo system, go to www.identity.ucla.edu.

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