UCLA In the News lists selected mentions of UCLA in the world’s news media. Some articles may require registration or a subscription to view. See more UCLA In the News.

Migrant farmworkers face evictions with no safety net | Los Angeles Times

Nearly 80% of California’s workers without legal status are in jobs deemed essential, according to a UCLA study released Monday, and on average these laborers lost 25% of their wages between February and April — more than any other demographic of employees…. “The gross injustice of how we treat immigrants has become very clear, not only from a moral point of view but from an economic point of view,” said Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, an associate professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies at UCLA and author of the study.

Coronavirus response hampered by high-level resignations | Los Angeles Times

“This is a near-impossible job to do well in normal times,” said Dr. Richard Jackson, a former California state health officer under then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and professor emeritus at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health.

Scorching temperatures on tap for Death Valley | NBC News

“Usually, California heat waves mean a dry heat, which is a saving grace. But what’s unusual here are the remnants of Hurricane Elida, which are adding significantly more moisture into the atmosphere and will make California much muggier,” said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.

COVID-19 surge fuels fears over school reopenings | Guardian (U.K.)

Linda Rosenstock, a professor of health policy and dean emeritus of UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, said the surge in cases among young people was a reflection of the widespread toll the virus has taken across the country. “A fair interpretation of this data is that as cases rise, more children are infected. In the same way the lockdown helped slow the rise, when restrictions were loosened, we saw more cases overall.”

Hot weather presents extra challenge during pandemic | KCRW-FM

“We started to do our analysis. We pointed out, well wait a minute, who has the discretionary income and time to travel around the world, become exposed to it, and come back? So, many people who were exposed to the coronavirus, they were immediately able to get tested,” said UCLA’s Dr. David Hayes-Bautista.

Are older adults getting too many cancer screenings? | Healthline

“The messaging of screening has never included any discussion about when to stop, so the public is not necessarily in tune to that and that’s part of the challenge,” Dr. Deanna Attai, an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, told Healthline. “The worry of cancer outweighs sometimes the perception of risk or the understanding of risk.”

Why jobless payments serve the public good | Knowable

(Interview with UCLA’s Till von Wachter) “Unemployment worries economists for a couple of reasons. A sudden loss of income is not good for the individual, but it’s also not good for society. You have a lot of workers cutting back on buying things at the same time as they are no longer generating the goods and services that other people consume, potentially leading to a vicious cycle. There’s also a concern that if people stay out of work too long, they become less employable, which impacts the overall economy’s productive potential.”

Different ways to look at plant-based eating | Well + Good

“Vegetarians are people who do not eat meat, but may be flexible in terms of eating eggs, milk, cheese, and other products that may be derived from animals,” says [UCLA’s Dana] Hunnes. “They simply do not eat meat.” Those other products may include things like honey, gelatin, collagen, or white sugar.